Tales From A Broad

My year of teaching English in Japan is up. Next mission: backpack Asia before going home to the U.S.A. Currently HOME!





Taipei, Taiwan in 8 hours

Back from my vacation and what can I say? No blog post could do justice to the country (jungles are neighbors to the beaches), it's people (the land of smiles) and the food (did u know fried bugs are packed with protein?). So, I'm going to have to write seperate posts about it throughout the week.

I left Fukouka, left the cold, the over-the-top politeness that makes Japan Japan, left my schools and students without looking back. I had an 8 hour layover in Taipei, Taiwan, enough time to ditch the airport and do some speed sightseeing. But, I only made it to Taipai 101, the world's tallest building, because there were so many shops.Nohting particularly memorable happened in Taiwain except that I was hunted down by a group of teen girls for a "picture with the--probably stupid--American" and autographs. It felt so weird.Note the girl left of me pretending to kiss me. Oh yea, why is it that Koreans, Taiwanese, and Thai people--all more poor and, supposedly not as developed as the Japanese--able to speak English 5 million times better than the Japanese? Yet another moment in my life in Asia where I'm left with my arms in the air, muttering, "Nani (What)?!?"
« Home | Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »

At 20:10, Blogger J-girl said...

Not that you actually wanted an answer to why Japanese can't speak English as well as other countries, but I'll give you one anyway:

Japanese is a language isolate, meaning that it is not known to be related to any other language. If English is your native language, it is more difficult to learn than Chinese and Thai, although Korean is similar in difficulty (the U.S. government has done studies on this). I'm sure it is probably the same in reverse. It has relatively few sounds compared to English, so Japanese have to learn many new sounds when they begin to learn English. Add that to the usually low confidence and the isolationist tendencies of a lot of Japanese, and it doesn't make for a lot of language acquisition.

Okay, now that I have bored you, I also want to say I like your pictures. :)    



At 21:29, Blogger Cee Pee said...

aaah, it's all making sense now, thanks Cindi! hahah, love the analysis. ;o) I'm still blown away by the fact that every japanese person thinks a scarf is called a "muffler." isn'sthat something that goes on your car?    



» Post a Comment