Tales From A Broad

My year of teaching English in Japan is up. Next mission: backpack Asia before going home to the U.S.A. Currently HOME!





I Heart My Job

This is to show that I actually do work despite my recent blog entries of retardedness on the weekends.

Let me break it down. I have 7 schools in total: 2 high schools (one of which is my base school), 1 junior high, 3 elementary schools and one school for the disabled. I usually spend about 3 days a week at my high schools and the other two days are spent visiting the other schools. I visit my school for the disabled every 2 weeks while I visit the other elementary schools monthly.

The elementary schools and school for the disabled are my favorite because I have free reign on what I can teach them. I can plan parties and fun games. The high schools are more structured so I have to follow a boring lesson plan and grade papers. This usually consists of me drawing pictures of Yoda and Hello Kitty on their papers just to spice things up. A uniquely Japanese phenomena is that once students enter high school, they warp into these mutes who refuse do anything by themselves. Asking them a simple question like, “What is your favorite color?” turns into a roundtable discussion. They giggle shyly, cover their mouths with those stank rags their carry around (I hope they wash those REGULARLY) and ask all their friends around them for the answer. 5 minutes later, you’ll be lucky if they’ve responded. Complete spastiks. But, outside of class, they rush to talk to me and ask inappropriate questions about my love life, body and hygiene. This is my favorite part of the day. My all time favorite convo was with one of the students who told me, “Christine-sensei (sensei is a title added to the end of a teacher’s name), Japanese men are easy! HA HA HA” and ran away to brag to all his friends about what he just did. Other topics have included what moisturizer I use, why I have such long legs (Japanese people have long torsos, but are bow-legged and shooort) and if I can come over to their house. In America it’s sexual harassment; in Japan it’s hilarious.

This is my first day at my favorite elementary school, Yuno elementary. These kids are an absolute pleasure. After I gave my self-introduction about FL oranges, Disney World, alligators and such, they all stood up and sang a song to me. Not only do they ask for my autograph, but they also clap when I walk into the classroom. Their energy is contagious. One thing I must say is that I’m not a necessarily exceptional teacher. I don’t particularly care if they can remember the English words I teach them a week later (although that would be nice) because I don’t get to teach them on a regular basis. Rather, I’m just trying to sell them English and American culture. I want them to remember that they had a good time, not the name of vegetables or the days of the week. So, I act as silly as possible (those of you who know me well know that this is the norm for me anyway!) in class by making kissing noses to their cheeks with stuffed animals, putting pennies on their heads, singing their names when I call on them, randomly dancing, etc… I have officially become the pet gaijin (foreigner).
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At 20:15, Blogger Mo said...

Sounds so fun and the kids are SO cute! Have you taught anyone about Fantastic Planet or is this probably "old hat" since my guess is that it is a Japanese original?    



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